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in a densely packed, tightly inhabited urban area, just across the hudson river from new york city, in hoboken, new jersey, correspondent katy tur has been covering there for us all day, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian, for the first time since monday night people are able to leave their homes to get a good sense of what the damage is. but the water is still very high in a number of these areas, and they're not expecting it to be fully gone until at least tomorrow night. 20,000 people trapped, hoboken became a virtual island as 500 million gallons of water overwhelmed the town. by wednesday morning the national guard came in to help, delivering much needed food and supplies to those still stranded. >> one thing we truly need is more fuel. >> reporter: the hoboken mayor. >> we need more fuel, resources, food so anybody who is listening to this in the city of hoboken or neighboring towns who can get to us, we ask you to come and deliver your supplies. >> reporter: as the length of this mixture of water, sewer, and oil turned into ponds, some got their first chance to assess the da
is returning to normal in new york city. all three airports are open as of today as is the new york stock exchange and broadway shows. problems still persist. traffic in the city is nothing short of a nightmare without public transportation wednesday manhattan streets were clogged with people trying to get back to work. there's some good news. subway and train service is starting up again today at least on a limited basis. >> i am declaring a transportation emergency. >> reporter: mayor bloomberg is mandating that all cars driving into manhattan has to have at least three people. >> i know it is inconvenient for a lot of people but the streets can only handle so much. >> reporter: half of all gas stations in the area are closed. the result, long lines. >> hundreds of cars here trying to get gas. >> reporter: analysts say it could get another week to get all the gas stations back up and running. lack of power continues to be a problem in this area of manhattan. officials say, though, that people in manhattan may see the lights go back on as early as tomorrow or saturday. in other parts of
to show you some of the hardest hit areas. >> and people living in working in new york city they depend on public transportation to get around. sandy brought all of that to a complete spot. find out when spans assistance is back and running. 83 is nice and clear. i'll let you know how traffic is shaping up on 95 and 695 coming up next. >> and you are taking a live look at new york city's time square where cleanup efforts are still underway following hurricane sandy. we'll have all the details coming up next on good morning maryland. >>> 4:39. thanks for joining us. in the aftermath of sandy hospitals in new york are struggling to stay open and operate in the height of the storm. the nyu medical center had to be evacuated, this morning another hospital is closing its doors and moving their patients. abc2 news kirk union key is outside that hospital. >> it's power is out. they had backup generators, they thought they'd be oak but they realized the flooding was worse than anticipated. they had to evacuate patients and relocate them to other hospitals in the area. it's been quite the proces
,000 still stranded in this new jersey town. >>> crisis in new york. nearly half the city without power. at least two dozen dead, as the biggest hospitals fight to stay up and running. forced to evacuate the sickest patients down dark flights of stairs. >>> and, the aftermath. our team travels to the outer edges of the storm's fury, to towns demolished by a giant wall of water, where people were rescued from rooftops and sandy's misery stretches on. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with bill weir and cynthia mcfadden in new york city, and terry moran in tom's river, new jersey, this is a special edition of "nightline," the perfect storm. october 31st, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran and i'm in tom's river, new jersey, one of the hard-hit communities on the water in this state. the water that superstorm andy hurled against the atlantic seaboard from maryland, all the way up to new york city and beyond. so many communities utterly devastated. you can see this kind of scene, as you see behind me, mile after mile on this coast. and two days after landfall now, the
or destruction. in new york city, the sun finally came out today, along with the first sounds of recovery. ( bell ringing ) the stock market opened for the first time this week. buses are back and there could be some subway service tomorrow. the biggest challenge remains pumping floodwaters out of tunnels. the u.s. military is helping, and we flew along today with lieutenant general thomas bostic, commander of the army corps of engineers. >> pelley: the police released this video today of staten island residents being rescued from their flooded homes. president obama joined governor chris christie on a tour of the new jersey shore, where sandy made landfall monday evening. >> we are not going to tolerate red tape. we are not going to tolerate bureaucracy. and i've instituted a 15-minute rule, essentially, on my team. you return everybody's phone calls in 15 minutes, whether it's the mayors, the governors, county officials. if they need something, we figure out a way to say yes. >> pelley: three days ago, this was a neighborhood of families. this evening, folks are returning to find all of their p
towards normalcy. >>> in new york this morning, more signs of life getting back to routine. the city's massive subway system is roaring back to life. except in hard-hit manhattan. >> more power is being restored to that area, as well. that's where we find abc's mark greenblatt once again this morning. good morning, mark. >> reporter: good morning to you. right now, the death toll from hurricane sandy stands at a grisly 74. and over in new jersey, there's a looming threat ona and ongoine from ruptured natural gas lines. but in this neighborhood in lower manhattan, the lights are on for the first morning since sandy struck. the nation's largest public transit system will begin rolling again this morning, but with limited service. some tunnels and stations remain flooded. and power is still out in much of downtown. but the lights began to turn back on in some areas near wall street. still, subways won't run yet to the city's financial district. traffic clogged the streets as people returned to work. new york city mayor bloomberg announced only vehicles with three or more occupants will
there helicopter 23 over staten island new york. it's named after 23 new york city police officers who lost their lives on september 11th. the crew performed a rooftop rescue in a flooded neighborhood. they helped five adults and a child trapped get out of their house. >>> around the nation, the united states border patrol they say an attempt to illegally cross into arizona was a huge failure. you can see why. the suspected smugglers tried to drive this jeep over a 14- foot high border fence using a makeshift ramps. patrolling agents saw it and the jeep got stuck. the suspects ran back into mexico and agents removed the jeep. they have received it as well as the ramp. >>> a fight for a parking spot took a dangerous turn. a 65-year-old man jumped on the hood of another car. the driver was inside that car. the whole thing caught on tape. now it turns out evelyn denese said harold coaler got out of control when he got out to get a parking spot. denese keyed her car. he confronted her. as she tried to drive away he jumped on the hood of her car. she drove with him on the car for about 300 yards
their lives in this storm is now up to at least 87 in nine states. in new york city, firefighters and police went door to door checking on residents. mayor michael bloomberg said the death toll in the city is up to 37 now. today, police recovered the bodies of two staten island children who were literally torn from their mother's arms and swept away on floodwaters monday. millions of people in 11 states from virginia to new hampshire are spending a fourth night in the dark. nearly 4.5 million homes and businesses are without electricity. but the cavalry is on the way. the air force is shipping utility trucks and power generators from california aboard 17 aircraft. and the new york city subway startrunning again, but the service was very limited. that meant long lines for buses. >> watch your step. be careful with the person in front of you. >> pelley: and even longer lines of cars cross the bridges into manhattan. in new jersey and on long island, cars lined up as far as the eye could see for gasoline. many stations are closed, either out of gas or without power for the pumps. in some parts
hoboken clearly from the west side of new york city. and as of last night, the mayor told us, there were as many as 20,000 people, of the population 50,000 people in the city, there were as many as 20,000 people still stranded in deep, impassable, and increasingly polluted floodwaters. the national guard did get to some of those people, starting late last night and into today. we'll have more about that very dramatic situation in just a moment. the national guard also arrived this morning in moonachie, new jersey, where the storm surge swamped the town very, very quickly. people in all sorts of housing in moonachie were caught unaware and trapped, but particularly folks in mobile homes had a very difficult time there. members of the national guard also rushed to the assistance today of new york city' bellevue hospital, which has been running on generators ever since the lower half of manhattan lost power monday night, when sandy came ashore. 17 million gallons of water flooded bellevue hospital's basement. after that shot we showed you last night of hospital employees making a human chai
slamming new york city. >> few more days and no power new york might get weird. >> on cbs "this morning." >> speaking foreign language >> when your city is flooding that's as bad as antonio [ bleep ] banderas. >>> welcome to cbs "this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york, norah o'donnell is in washington. the extent of superstorm sandy's damage has become clearer and more alarming, five a day. this morning sandy is blamed for 75 deaths in ten states. and about 5 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city many subway and commuter trains are now running and the city has put restrictions on drivers trying to get into manhattan. drivers also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. this morning hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore are facing months even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in things where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself on wednesday. jeff, good morning. >> reporter: norah, good morning to you. 14 are dead in new jersey but there is increasing concern that as more homes are searched
mister. >> and all that matters. >> amazing time-lapsed video of sandy slamming new york city, the water rushing in, power going out. >> new york might get weird with a few more days without power. [ speaking spanish ] >> when your city is flooded, that is as fluent as antonio >> when your city is flooded, that is as fluent as antonio [ bleep ] banderas. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in washington. as you wake up in the west, the extent of superstorm sandy's damage is becoming cloe ining c more alarming. blamed for 75 deaths in 10 states and 4.6 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city, many subway and xhouter trains are now running. drivers are seeing huge traffic jams going into manhattan. they also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore this morning are facing months, even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in atlantic city, where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself. jeff, good
it this way, in new york city, people can't find gasoline, and some went to find food from dumpsters from the sto stores, because they have no power or water, and what they have is still good, although it needed to be thrown out. and you will hear the memory of katrina more and more in the coming days. like katrina, three days out, we're still learning about places receiving very little help and attention, like staten island, ann curry has more. >> reporr: brian, good evening to you, that is right, the outrage boiled over here in staten island, because more than three days after the hurricane here, people from the close-knit community, accused them of responding much slower here than to the richer parts of the city. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> reporter: staten island has had enough. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help, immediately. >> reporter: residents here are asking why hasn't more help arrived? >> i think we're not getting more attention, because we are a working class neighborhood. and it is kind of like fend f
that fills up during major storms. >>> more on the situation here in new york city. some signs of recovery, if ever so slight. >> uh-huh. >> of street lights in lower manhattan which was inundated with wa water were restored yesterday. >> those living near the world trade center site, were first to have theirs turned back on. >> it was impossible to miss here in my hometown. lots of new yorkers walking instead of using limited bus service available. things will ease a bit today. parts of the city's extensive subway cyst,000 tell are reopening today. and measures are being put in place to ease gridlock on the streets. >> some folks had extremely long commutes because of the gridlock, yeah. resourcefulne resourcefulness, new york style. these folks hit a bank and used its power to charge cell phones. customers across northeast are having trouble completing calls because of knocked out transmission sites. late yesterday, at & t, team mobile, announced plans to share their networks during the aftermath. nice move, companies! >> new yorkers. >> been together. can you hear me now? >> resill yenl
. the damage felt at the seaside communities and jersey shore and coastal areas in and around new york city. after two days of suspended animation, wall street was up and operating on generator power, but the rest of lower manhattan remains dark, and the city subways and commuter rails which bring millions to work etch day have just barely begun to return to service. with some tunnels still full of seawater the damage will not be repaired overnight. two days after sandy made landfall emergency officials report at least 63 dead, including as many as 30 in new york and eight in new jersey. 6 million homes and businesses in 17 states without power. including around 650,000 in new york city alone. and costs to the country's economy estimated between $10 billion and $20 billion and growing. we're going to talk about the political, economic and environment implications of hurricane sandy for the next two hours, including how this natural disaster has linked this year's prominent foes, president obama andries and chris christie. both told reporters that they were determined to repair and rebuild t
. >> new york cannot be understood aside from this geography. indeed, no city could. be new york more so that almost any city in the river. because here you have what's really a natural location for a great city. it's probably one of the three greatest harbors in the world. and what's key is that at the very heart of new york is an island, manhattan. so that the indians, who were not in most places in the united states, in the early 17th century, were on the island of manhattan. because it was a natural location for a great city. >> that's a clip from the beginning of the definitive documentary about new york city, rick burns' "new york," a documentary film. as a natural location for a city, new york was sociologically and politically shaped by countless waves of new immigrants. but fundamentally, new york has always been a city shaped by water. the long, skinny island of brooklynn and queens to its east, staten island five miles south of long island. and the bronx, the only part of new york city on the american mainland, itself surrounded by water on three sides. if this week's megastor
back to normal. and between news for the 26 mile new york city marathon will proceed as planned this sunday. >> so welcome back, everybody. the pictures and stories left from the storm's after math are still jaw-dropjaw-dropping. let's begin with scott cohn in lower manhattan. >> larry, hurricane sandy sent about 4 feet of water in the financial district and they think it actually may be a total loss, about $300,000 worth of damage. and they don't know if insurance is going to cover it. you multiply that by thousands of businesses and you begin to get a sense of what the problem is. and then there's the issue of getting around and getting gas. mary thooyor thompson has that . >> people with been waiting in line two to three hours. there's a shortage of power to open other gasoline stations. a lack of electricity plaguing the tri-state area. >> dangerous conditions at the gas terminal which is crucial. workers here trying hard to clean things up, but tough to do so without power. over to jackie deangelis for more on the utility side of things. >> nearly 4.5 million customers stil
from the metropolitan transit authority. that's the agency in charge of mass transit in new york city. look at the destruction there. that is the brooklyn battery tunnel flooded almost to the ceiling there. there's one of the subway stations close by. >>> mayor bloomberg, governor cuomo are touring the damage today and we will be following along with them. >>> now, even if your house an car are okay, what can you do? gasoline supplies are running low for cars and generators. coming up, we're going to map out the system to show you where the real bottleneck, the problems are. >>> and, advice from new orleans to new york. they've been through this before in the port of new orleans. what are the lessons they learned and how can it help here in the new york metropolitan area? >>> sue herera is off today. simon is in and at nyse. >> this is a good rally that we've got on the back of the economic data that came through today in advance, importantly, of tomorrow's employment report. you see this we are off our highs but it is still triple digit. volume is good. the volume yesterday actually
it seemed like no one moving. >> i think anyone that tried to drive in new york city realized there are a lot of cars on the road. traffic is very heavy. >> reporter: new york's mayor bloomberg announced bridges in manhattan are open but limiting most incoming cars to three occupants or more. for the subways limited service tomorrow but a lot of work ahead. kennedy is up and running. la guardia still closed. the crane, now they say it is tied down and secure. but elsewhere, no progress. only a clearer view of the loss. here in new york city's breezy point more homes destroyed than first thought. and on the jersey shore, a simple fact comes to thought for the mayor of seaside heights. >> we are taking baby steps. we will sort it out at the end trying to get semblance of what was. >> a short time ago andrew cuomo tweeted this picture that we want to show you. a picture of national guard troops moving patients out of bellvue hospital. he thanked them for their help. they have been working tirelessly to get the patients to safety and work the bucket brigade that has been carrying
like i have never experienced in my life in new york city. it's something that has been missing on the streets of new york during the storm. they were empty, but today with public transportation shut down, and the crane disruption, commuters sat for hours and hours and hours in bumper-to-bumper traffic. we ran into a lot of trouble ourselves as we tried to get to hoboken. it took us a half hour to move two blocks and another two plus hours to get to hoboken which is five miles away. hopefully this will make the commute easier for some, tomorrow parts of the new york city subway will reopen which is miraculous because the pictures you're seeing, that's still the case in some parts of the system but they've managed to open other parts. it's an incredible testament to new york. still to come, coming to the rescue, i spent the day with the national guard in hoboken, new jersey, going door to door helping people from their homes and governor cuomo of new york visited what's left of a queens neighborhood torched by a massive fire. residents tried to come home for the first time and fo
insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global predicts that if the areas affected by sandy lose a quarter of their output for just two days, it would knock about $25 billion off u.s. economic growth in the fourth quarter. that could be as much a 0.6%. but longer-term, some of the financial losses should be recovered by repair and rebuilding efforts. home improvement stores like home depot and lowes will likely get a boost in sales. many construction jobs will be created to rebuild homes and businesses. and governments will be spending huge amounts of money to repair subways, roads, and bridges so all of those efforts should help boost econoc activity early next year. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: joining us now for a closer look at sandy's economic impact, mark zandi, chief economist at moody's analytics. you know, mark, people often hear that when there's a sdater like zandi, that it's actually a boost to the economy. is that going to be tr
" steve moore is here with all of the facts. >>> thanks but no thanks. new york city mayor bloomberg tls president obama, not to visit the big apple after the storm. i say thank goodness. but one of my guests says bloomberg is way out of bounds. he is here to disagree with me. even when they say it's not, it is always about money. melissa: first after a two-day hiatus, let's look at market headlines. wall street swung back into gear on the first day of trading since superstorm sandy. stocks were choppy throughout the session. they closed mixed throughout the day. dow closed down 10 points. home depot closed higher on the dow. expected demand of home and construction suppli sent shares up 2%. that makes sense. facebook shares tumbled 4%. a lockup expired on 229 million shares today. another 804 million shares will become unlocked on november 14th. >>> lots of damage to assess. the president just spoke after touring new jersey with governor chris christie today. while super storm sandy continues on its path of destruction the area northeast of pittsburgh is the latest to get hit. leaving c
of picking through the rubble and those treasured possessions they had. just outside of new york city, kirk i know that you started out here in maryland over on kent island and made your way through new jersey. give us an idea of how bad it is and the things you've seen along the way. >> reporter: well, here in hoboken they're dealing with power outages and flood waters which have receded. we made our way up the jersey shore and saw some pretty unbelievable things. we stopped in cape may, a beach called reed's beach. we saw homes decimated by the storm, entire living rooms ripped off the back of the home, unbelievable stuff, and further north of new jersey we found a marina that had also been destroyed by the storm, boats tossed around like toys, probably a good 30 to 40 boats destroyed. i talked to at least one boater out there who said he couldn't believe his eyes. he could not believe what he was seeing. many people describing it the same way from reed's beach to that marina. they're saying it looks like a bomb blew off and just destroyed everything in its path. back here in hoboken, the a
waiting for the flood waters to go down. people in new york city are heading back to work. there are long lines waiting for buses because of the crippled transportation system. we have more on that from the satellite center. >> one estimate has damage from the super star running as high as $50 billion. that could make sandy the second costliest storm. there are some areas waiting for help to arrive. three days later, the death toll continues to decline. the national guard rules and to an area where 20,000 are standard. >> we do not have that much food. >> further south natural gas leaks from destroyed homes. crews have not been able to get here to turn off the gas. >> we never really expected this to be this bad. >> we're awed and humbled by nature's destructive power. we mourn the loss of so many people. our hearts go out to those who have lost their loved ones. >> parts of new york city remained paralyzed. lines for buses seemed unending. traffic is worse as police and forced three passenger car pool requirements. some drivers running outg to fill up. >> this is my last time. >> some su
concerned about the chance for more fires. in new york city, and i'll have more on is that coming up at 5:30. >> close to 100 homes just leveled by fire. >> leveled. leveled it's crazy. >> and surrounded by water that's the thing that's amazing. homes are surrounded by water but the fire is just -- >> something. >> turnings them to ashes. >> you look how difficult is a for the first responders to get in fight fire with all the flooding. >> thanks kristin. >>> we do have a few school closings to tell you about this morning. >> in anne arundel county the following schools don't have power so they will not be able to hold classes today -- in prince george's county -- in frederick county -- you can check out our website anytime, day or night, wusa9.com, for closings and delays. >>> hundreds of montgomery county teenagers are coping with the loss of a classmate this morning. >> such a sad story, christina morris-ward was struck and killed while walking to seneca valley high school. 9news now reporter julie wolf is live with more on the story, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, we are her
is did the new york city rat survive hurricane sandy? >> please. >> all the flooding. >> they would survive a nuclear war. >> that's the thing. everyone thinks, an urban legend, there are just as many rats under, under new york, an old city built on top of, all of the sort of, the different layers of new york. they think there is one rat for every person. which would make 8 million rats. don't think there are 8 million rats. >> disgusting. >> i remember growing up, taking the 14th street, l train. they're not afraid of you. walk up to you. look at you. run along the third rail which is, supposed to electrocute them, does nothing to them. >> everywhere in the subway. what did the story say? did they survive this? >> some didn't. majority did. >> good thing maybe some of the babies washed out. took out a younger generation. some of the ones that were n nesting, got drowned. they'll make it no matter what. this weekend. most people half a chance to relax, cope with what is happening. may want to look for a new cocktail, something, different, new. jack daniels has a thing for you. a whi
. >> as for the new york city subway, you are looking at the hardest hit of all 468 stations. joe leader oversees maintenance >> we had barricaded up top with wood plywood and sand bags to keep the water out. when the surge came, to brought down all this material that doesn't belong here. large pieces of lumber, and that broke through the barrier, and allowed more water to come in. >> as much as the water's gone down, we're still two levels worth of water till we get to the tracks? >> absolutely. >> it will take a week alone just to pump out the water. but the subway system will be in partial service tomorrow. in manhattan, grand central terminal reopened after its longest closure ever in its 100 year history. >>> then there are those who are still just trying to get back home from the east coast. mark sayer talked with some passengers. >> reporter: a united flight from new york was one of the first to arrive in the bay area >> it was pretty hellish. >> reporter: stranded travelers like richard titus say the past few days have been quite stressful. >> i was staying at a hotel, they took good ca
and in new york city, even with the power out, trick or treaters took to the streets. >> in this part of lower manhattan, the lights are on for the first time since sandy struck. all three major airports will be back online. >> thanks so much. people in our area cleaning up as well from hurricane sandy, continuing that process. trick or treaters walked past falling trees and crews fixing power lines. people concerned about flooding have been keeping an eye on the potomac river. >> it being halloween night, you want to see the sights and all the kids in their costumes but coming down here, you to watch out for your vehicle. it will flood quickly. >> in alexandria, people were putting items back in their buildings. >> the aftermath of sandy may help to create some new jobs. >> let's look at linda bell at bloomberg headquarters. good to see you made it back to work. >> yes. millions of people without power including me and many in my neighborhood. the streets are dark. the traffic lights are off. sandy of course long gone. yesterday the new york stock
, what you get, wow, look at this line. speeding it up now, northern new jersey outside of new york city. it just goes on and on and on. fortunately things should get better at some point. try telling that to somebody who runs out of gas while waiting in line to fill up. and here you have a picture of a guy in new jersey who had to siphon what little gas he had out of his car so he could fill his generator. keep in mind, sandy effects people across 17 states. along the coast, there is destruction on a scale that this region has never before witnessed. four and a half million homes are still without power as fox reports tonight. and now the latest estimate for the storm's economic damage? a staggering $50 billion. that would make sandy the second costliest storm trailing only virginia. the federal government is feeding hundreds of thousands of victims who in many cases no longer have homes. >> fema worked with our national guard. i'm going to join them now in bringing 1 million meals to new york. >> shepard: a warm meal in a region where it is now november and temperatures are dropping fa
.6 million homes and businesses still in the dark this evening. in new york city, police are out there enforcing an hov requirement if you want to drive your car into manhattan. in hoboken, new jersey, nearly 20,000 people stranded in their homes by flood waters. in large areas of the jersey coast are in ruins with homes, piers, board walks simply wreck. bruce johnson reports from a marina in atlantic highlands, new jersey, where sandy tossed around dozens of boats just like toys. >> reporter: i'm bruce johnson in highland, new jersey, another one of those small beach towns devastated by the storm. back over there, that's new york city. well what we want you to see is this way. you won't believe it. damage from this storm. millions of dollars in losses to these boats. big, small, luxury boats. working people, gone. >> it was rolling waves. and they were just both coming in, floating along everywhere. you didn't know which way they were coming from. just amazing. >> reporter: you are looking at more than 600 boats. both destroyed. you're looking at the harbor master here. the form
. welcome, everybody. our "starting point" this morning, the aftermath of the superstorm. new york city slowly getting back to normal this morning, but no heat, no power, gas running low. bumper to bumper traffic. patience is being tested. some subways are running again this morning, so many are buses. fares, free, today, as workers are trying to keep the financial heart of the country beating. rob marciano this morning at the brooklyn bridge for us. hey, rob, good morning! >> reporter: good morning, soledad. there'll be a lot of foot traffic once again over this bridge. and if you are in a car, you'll need at least three people in that vehicle. carpooling is going to be the call today, because yesterday, there was absolute gridlock across the city. we didn't have much in the way of bus lines running. these subways were still shut down. all the people that would typically travel underground were trying to get to work aboveground. and boy, some places, there was chaos. i mean, people pushing and shoving, just to try to get on a bus. many buses that were traveling past 10th and 14th stree
.t.a. here in new york city. >> oh, sure, okay. [cheers and applause] >> yeah. >> that's a busy job. >> yes. >> a lot to do? >> see a lot of these running around. >> yeah, i know. the rats? [laughter] >> oh. >> but those aren't made of rubber, so... >> oh, no, no, no. >> yeah, yeah, yeah. >> that one's looking kind of hungry. [laughter] >> well, let me tell you. we're gonna give you a fun halloween-themed question. you get it right and you get $1,000. >> okay, all right, all right. thank you. thank you. >> there's only one caveat to all of this. in order to play for $1,000, you have to also wear the wig that jason had on. >> is that the wig he just took off? >> what? >> is that-- >> that's the wig he just took off. it's fine. >> that's worth $100,000. >> [laughs] [audience whistling, cheering] [cheers and applause] got it? >> yes. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. now we're talking. >> i'm ready. >> okay, alan says he's ready. you guys, are you ready? [cheers and applause] then let's play millionaire. [dramatic musical flourish] all right, alan, or whoever you are. i'm so confused. a new race called "
elderly. that brings the number of dead just in new york city to 34. the damage on long island, new york is severe. about 77% of power customers do not have electricity and could remain in the dark for as long as ten days. partial subway service is scheduled to resume tomorrow in new york city along with more railway and bus service. and we have new video released by firefighters in greenwich, connecticut showing the conditions during the storm as they tried to put out a massive fire that destroyed multiple homes. in hoboken, new jersey just across the river from manhattan portions of the city remain underwater tonight. the national guard has been brought in to help people stranded in their homes in hoboken. joining me now by phone is nbc news chuck todd, who was traveling with president obama and governor christie today in new jersey. chuck, tell us what the trip felt like. when i look at those two men together, it looks to me as the way that not necessarily on this particular subject but it's the way serious men and women of government want to work together regardless of part y. and th
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